Latin students created Roman monuments

Sophomore+Latin+student+Christopher+McKenzie+draws+another+student%27s+project.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Latin students created Roman monuments

Sophomore Latin student Christopher McKenzie draws another student's project.

Sophomore Latin student Christopher McKenzie draws another student's project.

Sophomore Latin student Christopher McKenzie draws another student's project.

Sophomore Latin student Christopher McKenzie draws another student's project.

Alaina Galasso, Opinions Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Latin 2 classes had a “walking tour of Rome” today where they viewed each other’s creations replicated from a famous Roman monument and shared their research with the class. The students have been using the art patio and some of the supplies, including cardboard, to create a single building such as the Colosseum or the Pantheon.

“I wanted to give the students a strong visual and tactile connection to the ancient word,” Latin teacher Sarah Buhidma said. “I also wanted them to work with their hands to make learning more active in our Latin class.”

The students and their partners have had about two weeks to complete their projects. They began by researching the building they selected; collecting pictures and details that they would bring to life later.

“This was a fairly interesting experiment and I definitely liked it,” sophomore Latin student Cameron Clarke said. “My partner and I’s clay surprisingly stayed and that was probably one of the best moments.”

The Latin students then began to build their monuments in art teacher Thao Phan’s classroom. Some students opted to just create their buildings out of cardboard, hot glue, clay and paint. The students were encouraged to focus on the details of the piece that they could explain to the class. They gave a quick presentation then were asked to draw each others projects so they got a final grip on what each monument was.

“It was a very fun project to complete with my partner,” sophomore Latin student Mark Schriner said. “It was interactive and I enjoyed learning more about these important buildings.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email