Junior achieves perfect score on PSAT

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Junior achieves perfect score on PSAT

Laura Figi, Spotlight Editor

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Many students stress over the PSAT, but junior Jeremy Cummings was prepared. After all, numerous practice tests, meetings and preparation made the test out to be like just another practice round. Although he only aimed to achieve qualification for National Merit status, Cummings has become the first male student from Vandegrift to claim a perfect score on the PSAT, and successfully made his way into VHS history.
During the test in October, Cummings scored a flawless 240 and was the only perfect score in the district for the year. He has qualified for National Merit and the score has opened many academic doors for him—including substantial scholarship money.
“I think the PSAT is a test on how good you are at taking tests, not how much you know,” Cummings said. “I was surprised, I personally think it was luck.”
Cummings balances his studying for several tests with his packed schedule, which includes five AP classes, and other extra-curricular activities he participates in, such as math and science UIL and playing Tuba in the marching band.
“I think it’s easier to take AP classes when you have a tough schedule,” Cummings said. “You’re less likely to procrastinate.”
Cummings excels at his extra-curricula’s as well—having taken 5th place in Number Sense, 2nd place in science and 4th in math and calculator UIL at the last meet at Westwood High School on Feb. 21.
“He will likely be kind of romanced, if you will, by some colleges,” Christa Martin said. “If you have this roundabout resume where you have band or some club interest going on, and you show that you have more than just smarts, it’s really awesome.”
Cummings plans to pursue a career in physics and intends on applying to Harvey Mudd College in California or the California Institute of Technology.
“It’s been rigorous but exciting,” Cummings said. “It’s fun to not have any classes that are boring.”

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