Mental Health Week: Impacting students in a positive way

The+Counseling+and+Mental+Health+class+getting+ready+for+Mental+Health+Week+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Mental Health Week: Impacting students in a positive way

The Counseling and Mental Health class getting ready for Mental Health Week

The Counseling and Mental Health class getting ready for Mental Health Week

The Counseling and Mental Health class getting ready for Mental Health Week

The Counseling and Mental Health class getting ready for Mental Health Week

Zoe Dowley, Feature Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






In the past, Mental Health Week at Vandegrift hasn’t been in the spotlight, nor has it been effective in inspiring positive mental health for students. I remember last year when they began to hand out the wristbands throughout the school, to draw everybody in so that we were able to feel that we’re not alone. Since I was in Principles and Human Services class my junior year, I was prepared to take Counseling and Mental Health my last year of high school to learn more about Social Work, which is a subject I want to major in.

Little did I know that Counseling and Mental Health would plan the entire week of Nov. 9-13 with morning announcements, PIT lesson plans, social media posts and a bunch of posters all around the school. A group was assigned a certain day of the week and a set theme that would be the main focus of the day. The week’s themes consisted of Monday- “What is Mental Health?” Tuesday- “You’re Not Alone” focusing on suicide, self-harm and depression, Wednesday – “Stand Tall” against abuse, bullying, self-image and unhealthy relationships, Thursday – “Take a Breath” coping strategies and stress relieving and Friday – “Positive Mindset.”

My group was responsible for Wednesday, where we gave the morning announcements, put up posters and planned a PIT lesson plan. We also created a big black banner so students could sign a statement to “Stand Tall” against abuse, bullying, self-image and unhealthy relationships. Many people signed the banner, but PIT was the place to go if anybody needed support. Our PIT lesson plan consisted of first a game, then advice and small groups. The game was for partners, where one person would talk about something negative in their life and the second person would point out the positive in the situation and vice versa. After the game we gave students the chance to give us a scenario to give advice on such as a situation involving a bully.  We then split up into our small groups.

When our day came to a close, we took down our posters and got ready for Thursday. Mental Health Week has taught me to appreciate all of the available resources on campus along with allowing me to meet new people, learn more about mental health and having the opportunities to impact the school in a positive way. I hope that Mental Health Week will continue to leave a lasting impression on the students and faculty of Vandegrift.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email